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Spain: Natural Sciences University Develops Superior Biomolecules for Controlling Pathogenic Microorganisms

| Editor: Ahlam Rais

The Universitat Jaume I (UJI) has found biomolecules of plant origin and it has been tested against plant pathogens as well as pathogens of clinical interest in order to obtain high-quality commercial products for the agricultural and pharmaceutical industry.

Researchers from the Biochemistry and Biotechnology Research Group at the Universitat Jaume I have identified and obtained biomolecules of plant origin.
Researchers from the Biochemistry and Biotechnology Research Group at the Universitat Jaume I have identified and obtained biomolecules of plant origin.
(Source: UJI)

Spain – Researchers from the Biochemistry and Biotechnology Research Group at the Universitat Jaume I have identified and obtained biomolecules of plant origin, which have been tested against plant pathogens and pathogens of clinical interest, with the aim of obtaining high-quality commercial products that can be applied in the agricultural and pharmaceutical sectors.

In the agronomic sector, the work team aims to achieve products based on biomolecules, through eco-compatible techniques with agricultural production for the control of plant pathogens, through the induction of plant defenses, which could act as a vaccine against different diseases. At present, this is one of the most interesting lines of action for both the business world and for public institutions.

The disease control approaches used so far are based on the use of chemicals that can be harmful to the environment, wildlife and even people. However, new methods of pathogen control are currently being developed, based on the use of this type of natural compounds of plant origin, which act directly on the pathogen and enhance the innate resistance of plants.

In the pharmaceutical sector, one of the main current problems is the emergence of resistance to antibiotics by pathogens of clinical interest. The control of the diseases caused by these microorganisms is a major challenge for health administrations and pharmaceutical industries. New biomolecules could alleviate the problems caused by multi-resistant pathogens against antibiotics.

These new biomolecules have been experimentally validated in the laboratory and agronomic environments. The research group would be interested in developing and adapting this technology to specific applications through licensing agreements with companies committed to improving people and plant health and welfare.

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