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Germany: Genome Editing Sartorius and Brain to Join Forces in Research on Novel CRISPR-Cas Nucleases

Editor: Alexander Stark

The life science group Sartorius and Brain Biotech intend to jointly research novel CRISPR-Cas genome editing nucleases. The goal is to find suitable solutions for specific applications in the life sciences sector.

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Novel CRISPR-Cas genome-editing nucleases can be used to modify genetic material in cells by specifically altering genes and inserting them into the genome or by removing them altogether.
Novel CRISPR-Cas genome-editing nucleases can be used to modify genetic material in cells by specifically altering genes and inserting them into the genome or by removing them altogether.
(Source: Public Domain / Pixabay )

Goettingen/Germany — Genome editing enables the targeted and precise insertion, removal or modification of a DNA segment in the genome of a living organism. Within a research project, Sartorius is testing the novel CRISPR-Cas genome editing nucleases in a series of cell lines. Through a collaboration, Sartorius and Brain aim to push the performance of the cell lines in different directions in order to accelerate the entire development and manufacturing process of future biopharmaceuticals and make them more cost-effective.

To this end, the two companies are collaborating at an early stage on a promising genome editing technology portfolio. Novel CRISPR-Cas genome editing nucleases can be used to modify genetic material in cells by specifically altering genes and inserting them into the genome or by removing them altogether. Scientists use this biotechnological gene editing process, for example, to make plants more resistant to pests or drought or to produce biological fuels. In biopharmaceuticals, gene scissors can lead to new therapies and improve the chances of curing a wide range of diseases such as cancer, neurodegenerative diseases or hereditary diseases.

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