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Imaging Decode 3D Biology

| Editor: Doris Popp

Leica Microsystems has launched a new class of instruments for high-speed, high-quality imaging of a large diversity of samples.

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HeLa cell spheroid stained with Alexa Fluor 568 Phalloidin (Actin) and YOYO 1 iodide (Nucleus). Acquired with a standard wide field fluorescence microscope (left half) and an exposure of the same sample taken with a THUNDER imager (right half).
HeLa cell spheroid stained with Alexa Fluor 568 Phalloidin (Actin) and YOYO 1 iodide (Nucleus). Acquired with a standard wide field fluorescence microscope (left half) and an exposure of the same sample taken with a THUNDER imager (right half).
(Source: Leica Microsystems)

Thunder Imagers allow to visualize clearly in real time details even deep inside thick samples of biologically relevant models like model organisms, tissue sections, and 3D cell cultures. As it says in a press release, this makes Thunder Imager a cost-effective and speedy alternative to methods like structured illumination or spinning disc. Thunder Imager eliminates the out-of-focus blur that clouds the view of thick samples when using camera-based fluorescence microscopes. This is achieved with a new opto-digital method created by Leica Microsystems called Computational Clearing. The new technology makes visualization and analysis of large volume, thick specimens ideal for many biomedical applications where they are required, including regenerative medicine, cancer, and stem cell research to decode 3D biology in real time.

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